mole crickets

mole cricket (mōl) n. Any of various burrowing crickets of the family Gryllotalpidae, having short wings and front legs well adapted for digging and feeding mainly on the roots of plants. (Source: The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3rd ed.)

External notes: Three species are invasive in the southeastern U.S. where they are noted garden pests. The Northern mole cricket is native to the eastern and central U.S., where it lives in grasslands, meadows, and prairie ecosystems.

Internal notes: After the fact, I heard about a cricket census in my geographic area. Citizens and scientists walked around one evening and noted all the singing crickets and katydids. I wonder if mole crickets sing when they are underground.

Anagrams into: Lick more, etc.

This was another fortuitous dictionary find. The dictionary continues to be a welcome source of solace. I want to crawl inside its pages and stroll around, maybe set up a lean-to near the binding and camp out for a while. There is so much to see! So many interesting little photos of wondrous things of every variety under the sun. So many new words to devour.

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7 Comments

  1. Learning bird calls has got to be hard enough, how could one possibly learn to distinguish cricket songs? Nothing beats their tune, though. Some people are soothed by the sound of waves and water. For me, it’s crickets at dusk.

    Reply
    • Maybe they don’t go down to species level? I agree it sounds tough. And I find the sound soothing, as well, to the point where counting them might spoil the effect…

      Reply
  2. Camping out in the dictionary… I like the idea of that. Though sadly you would have to forego the camp fire over which to chew the cud of the words all around you, for fear of a dictionary fire.

    Reply
    • It’s true. That would be too risky. I guess I would just have to go to sleep when it got too dark to read. Maybe my dreams would be extra good, being surrounded by all those words.

      Reply
  3. isabelle

     /  September 18, 2013

    That’s a lovely idea, camping out in the dictionary, and you know , you’d not want for anything. I’m imagining if it was a fire you’re after you’d just go along to the relevant F page. As long as the word was there, you’d be as warm as toast.

    Reply
    • Good point. In that case, I think I would actually go to the relevant B page and sit by the bonfire. I sure love a good bonfire.

      Reply

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